Addition Bingo


Most of us probably remember playing Bingo as kids growing up. Well, how about Addition Bingo in the classroom, or even at home as a way of making "learning how to add" fun and engaging!

Bingo is so simple and even young children can quickly learn and enjoy the game! And that's one reason why addition bingo should be in every teacher and parent's math teaching tool-box.

Game Preparation

I recommend using cardstock when printing the game boards, and that way they'll last quite a bit longer. You can also laminate the game cards too either with your own laminater or you have them laminated later at your local office supply store like Kinkos or Office Depot. 

How to Play Addition Bingo

If you know how to play traditional Bingo, you're well on your way to enjoying Addition Bingo - the rules are the same - the winner must have 5 Bingo spaces in a row covered with tokens, either horizontally, diagonally, or vertically.

You can either choose a caller to call out the addition problems for each round, or you can have each player take turns calling the addition problems out. Either way, after the addition problem is called, each player checks to see if the answer to the addition problem is in one of the squares on their bingo card. If it is, they cover the square with one of their tokens.


Each player starts with a pile of Bingo tokens. Bingo chips are what players will use to cover the squares on their scorecards. Any small objects will work as Bingo chips, as long as they can fit inside the squares on the scorecards.

  • You can use poker chips, coins, or even small pieces of paper as Bingo chips.



To start, the first player draws an equation, states the color and answers the equation aloud.Example:  Clara draws a yellow 3+3. She says to the other players: “Yellow 3+3 equals 6. Yellow 6.”  Then everyone else looks on their boards to see if they have a Yellow 6.  If they do, they put a token on the space. Note: If you’ve already printed out Subtraction Bingo, you can use the same tokens.  So don’t waste your printer ink on them if you don’t need to!  Also to save on printer ink, you can use anything else you have available to use as tokens: beads, counting bears/blocks, M&Ms.




’t seem to be very gentle with games, so laminating is a necessity at our house.  It takes around 20 minutes from start to finish to prepare this game, including the laminating time. Also, this game uses a lot of printer ink.  If you would prefer to print it in ‘Black Only Mode’, you can color code it by using markers to create the different game boards and equation pieces, using the original colors as a guide.How to Play Addition Bingo

Just Not only is this game great addition practice for my 7-year-old, but it’s also good reinforcement of numbers and color recognition for my 5 and 3-year-olds.  It doesn’t hurt for them to hear these addition facts over and over in a fun game-type way.I recommend that you print this game on cardstock and laminate it if you have a home laminator.  It will last much longer that way!  My kiddos don’t seem to be very gentle with games, so laminating is a necessity at our house.  It takes around 20 minutes from start to finish to prepare this game, including the laminating time. Also, this game uses a lot of printer ink.  If you would prefer to print it in ‘Black Only Mode’, you can color code it by using markers to create the different game boards and equation pieces, using the original colors as a guide.How to Play Addition BingoI constructed this Addition Bingo to be very similar to its counterpart – Subtraction Bingo.  The rules are the same as traditional Bingo in that the winner must have 5 covered Bingo spaces in a row, either horizontally, diagonally, or vertically.Instead of using traditional B-I-N-G-O columns, I used different colored plus signs.  So the name of each column is the color+plus.To start, the first player draws an equation, states the color and answers the equation aloud.Example:  Clara draws a yellow 3+3. She says to the other players: “Yellow 3+3 equals 6.  Yellow 6.”  Then everyone else looks on their boards to see if they have a Yellow 6.  If they do, they put a token on the space. Note: If you’ve already printed out Subtraction Bingo, you can use the same tokens.  So don’t waste your printer ink on them if you don’t need to!  Also to save on printer ink, you can use anything else you have available to use as tokens: beads, counting bears/blocks, M&Ms.